Healthcare Service Needs of Human Trafficking Survivors: A Secondary Analysis


Dana Beck, FNP-BC, PhD student | September 21 | 11:30 AM-12:30 PM

Topic: Healthcare, Research | Knowledge Level: Beginner, Intermediate

Human trafficking is a human rights violation occurring around the world (Polaris 2014; United Nations, 2000). Despite the profound social, physical, and economic consequences of this crime, there is a lack of comprehensive research about the prevalence and needs of human trafficking survivors (Zhang, 2012). The purpose of this study is to describe the health service needs of human trafficking survivors seeking services at the University of Michigan Law School’s Human Trafficking Clinic. A secondary analysis of the University of Michigan Law School’s Human Trafficking Clinic closed case files from 2009-2016 was performed. Data was extracted from the legal files to create a database, and data analyses were completed using descriptive frequencies and logistic regression. Data was extracted from 65 closed cases made up of 49 female survivors (75.4%) and 16 male survivors (24.6%) between the ages of 13 and 68 years old (M=30.15). Survivors were victims of labor (56.9%) and sex (47.7%) trafficking. Logistic regression modeling indicated that trafficking experiences significantly influenced post-trafficking mental health needs. Survivors of human trafficking have extensive needs; however, there are many barriers to seeking and receiving comprehensive services (Chaffee & English, 2015). In order to serve this vulnerable population, collaboration between disciplines must occur.

Presentation Objectives:

·  Examine gaps in the research related to the service needs of survivors of human trafficking.

·  Explore the health and service needs of human trafficking survivors who sought legal services at the University of Michigan Law School’s Human Trafficking Clinic.

·  Identify potential avenues to improve the provision of healthcare services for survivors of human trafficking.

About the Presenter